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David Lewis

David Lewis

David C. Lewis, RFC is the owner of Twin Tier Financial. He writes extensively about personal and business finance, purpose and goal-setting, and both online and offline business marketing. Touch base with David by visiting twintierfinancial.com

FullTraffic manages its own ad network, a place that enables advertisers and publishers to exchange ad space. As we focus only on Full Page Advertising, FullTraffic is constantly improving to offer the BEST traffic quality.

3 Reasons Why Buying Web Traffic Is Better For Your Business Than Organic SEO

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3 Reasons Why Buying Web Traffic Is Better For Your Business Than Organic SEO
Paying for web traffic isn't as sexy as having Google (or some other search engine) showcase your website high in its search results for the simple fact of your awesomeness. The down-and-dirty practice of buying ads, and website traffic, is purely utilitarian. It brings web visitors who, in turn, bring money. Isn't that what you really want anyway? You Control The Listing When you buy website traffic, you're controlling your listing. With organic SEO, you don't really have control over what gets indexed in the results pages. Sure, there are things you can do to try to get a search engine to display what you want displayed. However, in the end, the search engine is the one controlling what gets displayed in its search results pages and where your organic listing is displayed. You Can Better Measure The ROI From Paid Traffic Perhaps the most frustrating aspect of organic SEO is the fact that you can't really track ROI in most...

Buying Adwords Ads Could Now Be Detrimental To Your Wealth

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Buying Adwords Ads Could Now Be Detrimental To Your Wealth
It used to be that buying Adwords was an easy way for you to get traffic to your website. Those days are over. In 2011, Google implemented some new "quality control" measures to allow users to block your ads. At least you're still only charged on a "per click" basis. How Adwords Used To Work In the good-old days, you could buy an ad on Google's ad network. The ads would be displayed on the homepage on the right side of the search results. Sometimes, ads would appear above the organic search results. These ads were, and are, clearly defined and separated from the organic search results. For ads above organic results, the ad shows a different color background. Last year, Google decided that users should be able to block adwords ads. Users can now click on "why these ads" to be taken to an ads preferences manager. From here, users can choose to block ads. Not good. You're putting your ads at risk for...

Why You Have To Buy Website Traffic Regardless Of Your SEO Strategy

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Why You Have To Buy Website Traffic Regardless Of Your SEO Strategy
Do you really have to buy website traffic? Yes. Yes you do. There is this idea floating around the Internet that you have two choices when it comes to attracting visitors to a website: you can either buy website traffic or you can obtain "organic traffic" through the search engines. The argument is a false dichotomy and needs to be put to rest. Organic Traffic Organic traffic is website traffic that originates from non-paid search results. Major search engines have two types of listings: paid and unpaid. Unpaid listings are, as the name implies, unpaid. Google uses a computer program called a "robot" (i.e. "Googlebot") to analyze your website's content and layout. It then ranks your website based on how relevant it thinks your website is for the keywords you are trying to target on your site. The whole idea behind organic rankings is that they are supposed to be objective. Because website owners...

The Empty Promises of Social Networks

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The Empty Promises of Social Networks
How good is social media for advertisers? It may surprise you to learn that social media may not be the panacea for advertising that it once was (if it ever was). Social media is developing a sketchy history due, in large part, to a few savvy journalists and editors. There are three main social media companies that have been the target of massive fake account creation - Facebook, Google +, and Twitter. Google + works something like Facebook in that you sign up to the website, create a profile, and then add people to your "circle of friends." On Facebook, this is affectionately called "friending." On Twitter, you "follow" other people. When they post something, you receive their message, called a Tweet. On Facebook and Google +, you receive an update when you log into the site. According to these social media sites, business is booming. People are signing up left and right. With all of these users on all of these social media...

62 Percent of Valentine's Day Searches Were Done on Mobile Devices

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62 Percent of Valentine's Day Searches Were Done on Mobile Devices
Google recently released some interesting data: about 62 percent of all searches on Valentine's Day were done via mobile devices. Google's move to focus on mobile search is paying off, it seems. But, are you cashing in on this opportunity? Google still has problems determining search intent. That's understandable. You can't expect an algorithm to understand what's inside of your head (not yet, anyway). However, it does know that "Brasa" is a steakhouse it understands that McCormick & Schmick is a restaurant worth dining at (at least, according to the reviews). Google reported that last-minute searches for flower-related items rose 227 percent during the week leading up to Valentine's Day. Whoops. It looks like there are a lot of last minute hopeless romantics. On "V-Day," consumers were 560 percent more likely to click to make a call than for the week preceding or following the week of...

How To Get Sandboxed By Google

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How To Get Sandboxed By Google
Most webmasters and SEO experts want to get higher rankings for their websites (or their client's websites). To do that, they have to know how to get sandboxed by Google so that they can avoid being sucked down into a search engine black hole. Buy Links The best way to get banned from Google is to buy links. It's amazing that companies like TextLinkBrokers still exist. This company tells you to put code on your website to automate the link buying process. Their code will automatically insert links into your website's content and keep track of where those links are. That's just a dumb idea for any number of reasons. The most obvious being that Google can easily detect paid links this way, and you set yourself up to be pounded by the algorithm once you're found out. The company defends its position by saying that "well, everyone does it." That's not a great defense. Companies like J.C. Penny have been taken down...

The Googlebomb Is Back

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The Googlebomb Is Back
Do you remember what Google was like before 2007? If you were doing SEO, you did. Back in "the old days," you could get a website to rank in the search engines for any term you wanted just by pointing enough links to the page you wanted to rank. Of course, you had to use anchor text to get it there. One of the most famous Googlebombs ever pulled off was the infamous George W. Bush incident. At one time, former President Bush's biography was ranked in the #1 spot on Google's search engine for the term "miserable failure.". Google fixed that problem in 2007, claiming that the Googlebomb issue had been resolved and that websites would no longer be able to game the search engine. This move effectively shut down spammers and SEO experts, preventing them from getting irrelevant websites and pages ranked for any given search term. At its core, the Googlebomb tactic exposed a chink in Google's search algorithm. Google was allowing SEO companies,...

Think Twice Before Redesigning Your Website

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Think Twice Before Redesigning Your Website
There's a lot of hatred and rage in the world, and you can do your part by redesigning your website. Yes, that's right, redesign your website and be prepared to reap the whirlwind. In a perfect world, your website visitors love you, they love everything you do, and they especially love it when you add functionality to your site every single day. The reality is that many people hate change. The more you give them change, the more they hate it. When Digg announced its redesign early last year, the company described it as "nice." Users retaliated with over 2,500 inflammatory comments. You see, people become accustomed to a set design. They become familiar with it. They become used to the upper right-hand corner where your search box is located. If you move it (like Wikipedia did), people become confused and outraged. Some users will think that the site has lost functionality even when your intention was to increase it. Jacob Nielsen, owner...

Survey Says "NO" To New Google Personalized Search

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Survey Says "NO" To New Google Personalized Search
In a surprising study of about 400 people conducted by research tool provider Ask Your Target Market, it was found that most people just plain hate Google's new personalized search results. That's surprising, as Google has really been pushing personalized search for a while now. It seems to make sense on the surface. If you're searching Google (or some other website for you heretics out there), you want results that are tailored to your likes and dislikes. I mean, who really wants search results that are "cookie cutter." Apparently, the bulk of the population does. Maybe people sense the non-objectivity of personalized search results. Maybe they don't want to see their friend's Google + profile show up when searching for "lol cats." Maybe users just don't like the idea of Google using personal information to spit out relevant results. In the survey, about 38.3 percent of the people surveyed said that they...

Google's Chrome Browser Nowhere To Be Seen, Market Share Drops in January

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Google's Chrome Browser Nowhere To Be Seen, Market Share Drops in January
Google's homemade Internet browser has been heavily promoted by Google since its debut in September of 2008. Google's baby, Chrome, promised to make Internet browsing faster, safer, and all around more enjoyable. It delivered, for the most part, on its promises. Then, Google went a little crazy with its promotional campaign. Ironically, the way Google promoted itself caused Chrome to virtually disappear from the search results. Market share for Chrome has mysteriously dropped over the last month - down 0.17 percent. A company that tracks market share of browsers suggests that it's because Google effectively banned itself from the search engines. Net Applications, which tracks some 160 million unique visits per month, reports that Firefox and Safari also saw market share losses in January. Who is getting all of the browser love? Microsoft, if you can believe it. Microsoft's Internet Explorer saw an increase in January of 1.09 percent. This...

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